Skip to main content

Banner Sponsors

Johnna's Mohair Store - Specializing in hand dyed mohair and alpaca
ThReAdTeDs - Traditional, crochet, fiber, patterns, supplies by Berta Hesen-Minten

Strawbeary designs Strawbeary designs
Lancashire
Posts: 25

Hi guys, just needing some advice. I've been making my bears for about a year now and have been using sassy fur for the smaller 5_6" ones and mohair for the larger ones. I've got absolutely loads of really nice faux fur from mohair teddy bear supplies in the UK but am really struggling with it! It's kind of fraying on the seams especially when I've stuffed them and trying to close the seams is a nightmare!
Should I be lining the fur or putting fray stop on the edges? It's given such great results from scissor sculpting the little cheeks that I want to use more of it but I'm finding it so hard to work with! Any help would be greatly appreciated!xx

dangerbears Dangerbears
Wisconsin
Posts: 5,994
Website

The backing fabric for faux fur really varies, from stretchy knits that you should most probably line, to nicely woven fabric that is as stable as mohair backing - and several variations in between. If you're having trouble with fraying, your idea of treating the edges with fray stop sounds like a good one.

It also took me some time to get used to working with faux (and one near disaster when I wanted to re-open a leg and couldn't locate the seam), but I've developed a pretty good relationship with it now.  bear_happy  As you say, it's wonderful for scissor-sculpting, and so, so soft.

Becky

Strawbeary designs Strawbeary designs
Lancashire
Posts: 25

Thanks for the reply Becky! Im going to have another go and use the fray stop on the edges. I actually thought Faux fur would be easier than Mohair to work with! As you say it will probably get easier just wanting to make sure I'm not missing anything i should be doing when using it! xx

jenny Three O'clock Bears
warwickshire uk
Posts: 4,413
Website

You can also paint with pva over the backing. Sometimes I incorporate tabs where the opening are so that when you close up the fraying doesn't happen.

Strawbeary designs Strawbeary designs
Lancashire
Posts: 25

Hi Jenny. Thanks for the reply! That's a great idea about the flaps!! That's the main place I'm struggling so I will definitely try that idea. The pva is worth a try as well as my fray check seams to be really thick. Thanks again.xx

jenny Three O'clock Bears
warwickshire uk
Posts: 4,413
Website

I've used Super sulky before now...which is a fabric stabiliser for embroidery etc. Not my idea I have to add.....Kelly Dean does this .
It comes on a roll and you just dissolve it in hot water and paint it on.

desertmountainbear desertmountainbear
Bloomsburg, PA
Posts: 5,399
Website

I use Sulky too mixed in water to stabilize loose woven and stretchy fabric. It works well.

Laura Lynn Teddies by Laura Lynn
Lexington, KY
Posts: 3,647
Website

Laura Lynn Banner Sponsor

I like using Aleene's Stop Fraying.  It's white, not clear like Fray Check.  I squeeze a little of it on a piece of plastic or something, then use a toothpick to gently apply it to the cut edges of a fabric that wants to fray.  I apply more to the areas where I will close a seam.... not just the edge - so it gives the fabric added strength.

Strawbeary designs Strawbeary designs
Lancashire
Posts: 25

Hi guys, thanks for replying! So I can get some sulky solvy water soluble stabiliser from create and craft, how do I use it? Do I just use it on the edges or all over the backing?x

desertmountainbear desertmountainbear
Bloomsburg, PA
Posts: 5,399
Website

If the fabric has any stretch at all you can just brush it all over the piece. I use it all the time with those looser woven fabrics. It will not make it as firm though as using a fray check type product. If it is really fraying you may choose to use that, or both.

Strawbeary designs Strawbeary designs
Lancashire
Posts: 25

Thank you, I have ordered some so will give it a try! I just wish I had more confidence with the faux fur as I have so much of it!..lol xx

tj Missouri
Posts: 2

Hello, I see this post is several years old but I am currently dealing with a mohair backing that is fraying. I've read about overcast stitching or zig zag stitching each piece of the bear to stop the fraying, using Fray Check and now I've come upon this post and am wanting to know more about this technique. I've never worked with Solvy Water Soluble Stabilizer before and am curious to know how big of a piece of stabilizer do you use with how much water? Also, what is the consistency, is it similar to Fray Check or thicker? Thank you in advance!
Kind regards,
tj

desertmountainbear desertmountainbear
Bloomsburg, PA
Posts: 5,399
Website

Hello TJ, I use Solvy on the newer Tissavel fabrics because the back is rather stretchy. There should be directions on the package. I usually cut a yard and dissolve it in about a cup of water. I usually paint in on the drawn pattern on the back of the fabric before I cut. I leave it dry and then cut. I does not remove all the stretch, but it does help stop those ends from fraying and it makes the fabric more stable.

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB

Banner Sponsors


Past Time Bears - Artist bears designed and handcrafted by Sue Ann Holcomb
Shelli Makes - Teddy bears & other cheerful things by Shelli Quinn